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GUARDIAN – The Ashes in tunes, Open appetisers, F1 on film and Arsenal in Vietnam

Don’t miss: music and cricket, Nick Faldo’s memories, Hunt v Lauda and football’s south-east Asia fun. Here’s this week’s …ASHES ATTRACTIONS …Are, firstly, on iPlayer in Gideon Coe’s show celebrating cricket, the Ashes and music. Already broadcast but with little fanfare, it’s a gem. Coe is joined by Derek Pringle, who selects tunes representing England and Australia, followed by cricket-themed classics from Hedley Verityesque by Half Man Half Biscuit (chosen ahead of one the Biscuits’ finest couplets from We Built This Village on a Trad Arr Tune: “Rehearsals afoot for the Christmas Play / It’s called ‘Roll The Square Arthur’ and mind what you say / It’s a cricketing farce with a thickening plot / Act One, Scene One – Brenda Blethyn gets shot”) to the glorious racket of Kick Down the Stumps by I, Ludicrous. Next, an extended version of Jonathan Agnew’s Desert Island Discs (Radio 4, Sunday, 10am), in which the broadcaster talks candidly about his life, family and career. Lastly, Ashes fever continues with the arrival of “cricket tea” crisps from Tyrrells. A “ham, cheese and tomato” flavour created, one assumes, because “cucumber, white bread and Earl Grey tea” didn’t focus-group that well.OPEN APPETISERS …Begin with Nick Faldo on Tuesday (5 Live, 9pm), as the six-times major-winning golfer talks about the championship. The programme, appropriately, was recorded at Muirfield, scene of two of three of Faldo’s Open wins. BBC2 preview the tournament on Wednesday (11.20pm) with a look back at previous Muirfield Opens, including the first in 1892, while ESPN Classic hosts Best Shots of The Open (Monday/Tuesday, 6.55pm) including Seve’s birdie on the 16th during his first Open win in 1979.FANTASY FOOTBALL …A fixture truly the stuff of dreams not long ago as Vietnam play host to imperialist running-dogs Arsenal at the My Dinh national stadium (Wednesday, ESPN, 1pm). A dream too for the locals, Arsenal are extremely popular in Vietnam and will be the first Premier League side to play in the country. Germany meanwhile rerun the Champions League final as Dortmund take on Bayern (Saturday, ESPN, 5.30pm) in the pre-season Telekom Cup, while for fans with withdrawal symptoms, there’s a fantasy 3pm, Saturday kick-off, as Liverpool play an Indonesia XI (ESPN).FORMULA ONE FACE-OFF …Between James Hunt (above) and Niki Lauda is explored in Hunt vs Lauda ( BBC2, Sunday, 9pm). The thrilling fight between the pair for the 1976 world championship is dramatised in Ron Howard’s film Rush, which looks to be a cracker and is out in September, but here archive footage, managers, families and friends tell the story of the remarkable year when Lauda came back from an appalling crash at the Nürburgring to take the title to the wire.ROWING ROUND-UP …Is from the Lucerne World Cup, which took place over the weekend. The highlights (Monday, BBC2, 3pm) come from the final event before the World Championships in South Korea next month. Great Britain, after a strong Olympic Games, will be looking for the perfect buildup in Lucerne.MUSICAL COMEBACK …Arrives with the hugely welcome return of Niall Quinn. Not that Niall Quinn. Rather the NQ behind The Hitchers, one of Ireland’s finest bands and authors of Strachan, voted best football song EVER! by readers of the Observer. Now going by the name Theme Tune Boy after a long-time break, he’s back with an album: Return of the Living Dead. A delirious amalgam of pop-punk, shot through with the acerbic yet touching wit and observational genius Quinn brought to his homage to the Scottish dynamo. Fans of that tune will love his new work, out now on iTunes, Spotify and at themetuneboy.com.CricketThe AshesArsenalLiverpoolFormula OneGiles Richardsguardian.co.uk © 2013 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

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GUARDIAN – Liverpool and Manchester are closer than they like to admit | Kevin Sampson

When Liverpool play Manchester United the rivalry is always fierce. But the respect is deeperThe back page of Friday’s Manchester Evening News carried a simple message: Show Respect. It was in reference to today’s match between Liverpool and Manchester United, which has, in recent years, descended from keen rivalry into poisonous enmity. Yet these great northern cities, with their enormous sporting and cultural legacies, have more in common than they care to admit.For all that they’re barely 30 miles apart, the citizens of Manchester and Liverpool were virtually unknown to one another until the 1830s. Prior to the establishment of the Liverpool & Manchester Railway, the cities were divided by Chat Moss, a vast and near-impassable bog. The L&MR was the world’s first twin-track passenger railway and the new link sparked a period of cross-fertilisation between the two regional superpowers.Their growth was swelled by refugees of the Irish potato famine in the 1840s, substantively contributing to each city’s distinctive character, too. The musical explosion that followed the end the Second World War and climaxed with the Merseybeat had its roots in country music. The DNA of country and bluegrass can be traced all the way from Billy Fury to Johnny Marr and is, in large part, due to the Irish influence.If there’s any rationalising this inter-city rivalry, it’s crystallised in the work of two artists who share a surname. The paintings of LS Lowry have become icons of quotidian factory life in between-war Manchester. Conversely, novelist Malcolm Lowry’s Ultramarine celebrates a pre-beatnik wayfarer’s compulsive desire for the freedom of the sea: the pragmatic realism of the Mancunian set against the romantic wanderlust of the scouse drifter. Each is a stereotype, of course; both cities march to an idiosyncratic beat.While the sound of Liverpool’s Cavern Club was shaking the world, the first tremors of another cultural earthquake were beginning to be felt in Manchester. The Twisted Wheel was the crucible for northern soul – arguably the first club in the country to court a multiracial crowd, dancing almost exclusively to black American blues and soul. The Beatles and the Stones were avid attenders. It’s unthinkable today but, without the Twisted Wheel’s notorious promoter, Roger Eagle, Tamla Motown and the blues and soul dynasty that followed may never have got a foothold in Britain.Eagle was also the man behind Liverpool’s Eric’s club, a post-punk dive that gave birth to Echo & the Bunnymen and Zoo Records, and which operated a reciprocal entry scheme with Tony Wilson’s Factory club. Wilson, for all his public baiting of Scousers, was sincerely fond of Liverpool. When 47 Liverpool councillors were suspended without pay in 1986, he organised a benefit concert – From Manchester With Love. It was only fitting that on the day of his funeral, Wilson’s coffin was carried to his resting place bearing a huge floral tribute: From Liverpool With Love.These rebellious, inventive, defiantly noisy neighbours have irritated and inspired each other for years. From Peterloo to Toxteth, George Melly to Morrissey – Liverpool and Manchester are just too close for comfort. Vive la différence.LiverpoolManchesterManchester UnitedLiverpoolKevin Sampsonguardian.co.uk © 2012 Guardian News and Media Limited or its affiliated companies. All rights reserved. | Use of this content is subject to our Terms & Conditions | More Feeds

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Mirror: Tevez’s bum, Ireland’s bling and Lampard’s ratings row

Italian website Gazetta Dello Sport had an interesting take on Saturday’s events in England… ** “We have massively toned it down,” says Stephen Ireland’s missus Jessica Lawlor of their legendary spending. “We try not to show off too much. We just matured. We just said, ‘D’you know what? It’s just stupid now’. We grew up, we grew out of it.” Alas Jessica – shortly to appear in stage show WAG The Musical – was speaking in the couple’s Cheshire mansion, where they enjoy a two-storey bedroom co…

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